MIRACLE MILE

mo // they + them // 20 // west coast // i tag pretty thoroughly but give me a shout if you need anything
Posts tagged "racism"
Asker ne-revez-pas Asks:
Hello, I saw you comment on a post about how missionaries in developing countries are ruining the cultures/societies of their people, and it really intrigued me. You see, I am about to go on a trip to Nairobi this coming June with the organization Me To We. Me To We is not religious and I'm not a religious person. But, while there I will help build a school and learn about Maasai culture. Do you feel that service trips without the intention of converting/teaching people are still alienating?
mo-betta mo-betta Said:

praxis-cat:

owning-my-truth:

I am radically against service trips where people go to “build schools” (or other facilities) in a developing countries, and I find them to be incredibly disempowering and paternalistic at their core. It all boils down to stroking the (usually white) egos of the volunteers to make them feel like “good people” and does NO longterm good for the community.

I just wish people thought more critically about international development and saw through the smoke screen of “aid” that many of these “development” organizations put up as part of the white savior industrial complex. Like it just seems so obvious to me that an organization that goes through all of the logistical and human effort needed to bring “volunteers” to build schools in ~*aFriCa*~ has values that are fundamentally not aligned with those of their communities. They do not have the best interest of locals at heart, at all. 

If they cared about the community, they would be building out local capabilities and talents rather than trying to make a quick buck from western volunteers. They wouldn’t be bringing in untrained (usually) white people from the West without any language skills or understanding of local cultural intricacies to a community that is most at need. Rather than siphoning resources toward making white people “feel good” about themselves and aligning their values with white supremacy and white savior-dom, instead they would be working to give that exact same business to local carpenters and construction workers. Or, worst case, they would bring in people using those same dollars to train community members so that they develop these critical skillsets for themselves and their community at large. Why not actually work in solidarity with a community and build together to improve and develop local capabilities in the longterm? Why must we instead center the white gaze and destructive paternalism, which is disempowering and harmful and only has one longterm impact: making the Western volunteers “feel good” about themselves for “saving the Africans”

It makes me sick.

I also think it’s just so indicative of the deepset narcissism that lies in white supremacy and Western global hegemony that somehow we think that we can “build a school” better than people who are actually from that community. You know the ones who intimately know their needs and those of their communities, far better than the volunteers swooping in for 2 weeks to “save” them. How sick is it that we presume that “expanding our global horizons” can come at any cost, including undermining the fabric of a community, breeding dependency, and pulling resources away from actually building out the longterm capabilities of the people in these communities? I discussed these topics at length with someone who worked in international NGOs for 7 years in Africa and who left incredibly jaded because she saw how the values of so many of these organization was focused on “more NGO, now” rather than doing the more important work of creating communities where the presence of NGOs fades progressively with time as these communities are empowered. 

The structure of the white savior industrial complex is one of disempowerment, damage and harm. Participating in it furthers this destruction and hurts these communities in the long run.

The vast majority of these international aid and development NGOs do not have our best interests at heart, and are simply there to make white people (and other Westerners) feel better for the “good deed” they did once in ~the third world~

It’s horrible.

This post is very important, and while it mentions this, it needs to be stressed that in many cases these charity construction projects are harmful to local economies. Many countries which are destitute are destitute because they are labor-rich and capital-poor, often times because local and national political structures horde capital at the top (and no, this is nothing like WIRD countries having income inequality, and the equation of the two is disguising.)

When you come in and build a school for free, what you’re doing is depriving the people’s largest resource, labor, from being able to turn a profit, and thus, you’re preventing poor people from getting work. If you really care about people AND build schools (where they cannot afford to build their own), then organize a community locally and provide the capital to build that school AND THEN MAINTAIN IT, rather than doing it yourself. That way they can tailor their institutions to their needs, provide work for their workers, and you provide a constant source of employment for teachers, education for children, and a healthier economy. There are also movements to help develop local technologies that can then be produced locally to free up the time of women, who usually bear the brunt of time-intensive tasks which pay poorly.

doeandthestag:

Statistical and Visual Representation of POC characters in New Who

I used data from the wonderful burntlikethesun.

The first set of data (colour coded in reds and pinks) is based on the number of POC with dialogue, but counting recurring POC each time they appeared in separate episodes. For example, instead of Martha just being counted once, she is was counted for each separate episode she appears in. The second set of data (colour coded in greens) is based on the number of POC with dialogue, but only counting each recurring POC once. So Martha and Mickey were each only counted once. The first set of data gives some idea of how important POC are to the plot, how developed they are etc. The second set of data is an indicator of how many individual POC with dialogue we have. 

(This data does not include minisodes, and does not including at least 4 WoC in prosthetics from RTD’s era: Jabe, Matron Casp, Sister Jatt, Chantho)

To give a fair comparison of the eras (since obviously RTD’s era has more episodes) I divided the number of POC in each set of data by the number of episodes from each era (not including the minisodes). This gave the average number of POC in each episode for each set of data. I then multiplied this value by 100 to give an accurate representation of how many POC with dialogue would be in 100 episodes from each era, for both sets of data. (Obviously in Moffat’s era, this would be if current trends continued.) 

I then represented these numbers on graphs.

The data used was raw data, and no one can deny that there is a problem here. The number has fallen by more than half since Moffat. We’ve had a serious decline in the number of POC in speaking roles. Oh, but Moffat’s show is so ~progressive~ isn’t it? 

(via hallo-catfish)

I had a boyfriend not so long ago who, whenever we got into an argument, would accuse me of “going soap opera.” “Here comes Telemundo!” he would shout. His (clearly gendered and vaguely racist) insult was supposed to make me feel like my anger wasn’t valid—that it was frivolous and silly, that I was being overly dramatic. This was his not-so-subtle way of trying to shut me up—by accusing me of being emotional. (Unlike men, whose anger is always logical, of course.) Unfortunately, calling me out like this often worked. It felt immobilizing to be called dramatic. Even if you know you’re being reasonable, we’ve internalized sexism so much, sometimes we even begin to doubt ourselves.

from Jessica Valenti’s He’s a Stud, She’s a Slut and 49 Other Double Standards Every Woman Should Know.

I wish I had read this a couple years back because this was my life.

(via giraffescanbefeministstoo)

Beware of any health professional - especially in mental health - who uses the same tactic. I saw a psychiatrist once who diagnosed me with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and recommended a particular therapy “to help with [my] dramatic tendencies”. I was in an intensive outpatient therapy program, which is a half-step from being hospitalized, and had the gall to question their techniques, which were based on outdated research and not up to current DSM standards - but what do I know? I’m an undergrad, they’re licensed professionals. They know better than me, right?

Utter bullshit.

The therapy she recommended was, unsurprisingly, useless, but more to the point, I went home and cried for three hours after she made that little comment. The implication was that my life-threatening illness, which had put me and my family through so much pain, was a result of me being needy and attention-seeking. That is the entire point of this strategy; to make you believe that your hurt feelings are baseless, invalid, and entirely your fault.

If someone does this to you, cut them out of your life and sterilize the wound.

(via robaemea)

shitrichcollegekidssay:

I wanted to take a minute to address PolicyMic's recent article on diversity in gender identity, '27 Powerful Portraits Challenging the Definition of What It Means to Be LGBT', which highlighted San Francisco-based photographer Sarah Deragon’s The Identity Project.
I will be blunt. This is racist. Definitively and absolutely. The term ‘three spirit’ is an appropriative bastardization of Native Two-Spirit identities, roles which have very specific meaning that cannot be preserved outside of that cultural context. Let me repeat this: white people cannot  be Two-Spirit because this is an identity that is intimately tied with the individual’s role in a specific tribe.
The solution to this is not to create a direct and bastardized derivation. This is still racist. To attempt to assume either Two-Spirit, or this racist perversion, is is racist and culturally appropriative. Similarly, ‘third gender’ as an identifying term is available only  to IaoPoC (Indigenous and/or People of Color) whose cultures have non-binary identities for reclamation. This particular term has been used oppressively by Westerners to marginalize the people of these cultures. It is for them alone to reclaim and use, if they so choose.
We have already spoken on cultural appropriation and it’s harmful effects before. This is not up for debate. As we promote further diversity and inclusion, this needs to be addressed in all communities: fetishization of Natives and their cultures, as perpetuated by white supremacy and popular American culture, cannot be allowed to continue.
Stand with us in respect and solidarity.

shitrichcollegekidssay:

I wanted to take a minute to address PolicyMic's recent article on diversity in gender identity, '27 Powerful Portraits Challenging the Definition of What It Means to Be LGBT', which highlighted San Francisco-based photographer Sarah Deragon’s The Identity Project.

I will be blunt. This is racist. Definitively and absolutely. The term ‘three spirit’ is an appropriative bastardization of Native Two-Spirit identities, roles which have very specific meaning that cannot be preserved outside of that cultural context. Let me repeat this: white people cannot be Two-Spirit because this is an identity that is intimately tied with the individual’s role in a specific tribe.

The solution to this is not to create a direct and bastardized derivation. This is still racist. To attempt to assume either Two-Spirit, or this racist perversion, is is racist and culturally appropriative. Similarly, ‘third gender’ as an identifying term is available only to IaoPoC (Indigenous and/or People of Color) whose cultures have non-binary identities for reclamation. This particular term has been used oppressively by Westerners to marginalize the people of these cultures. It is for them alone to reclaim and use, if they so choose.

We have already spoken on cultural appropriation and it’s harmful effects before. This is not up for debate. As we promote further diversity and inclusion, this needs to be addressed in all communities: fetishization of Natives and their cultures, as perpetuated by white supremacy and popular American culture, cannot be allowed to continue.

Stand with us in respect and solidarity.

(via vapidqueer)

(via pollums)

cakeandrevolution:

cakeandrevolution:

If you’re not upset about Katniss, Tonto, or Khan being played by white people, but you are upset about Annie being played by a black girl, you’re probably racist.

And by probably I mean definitely.

(via euro-trotter)

As Black History Month ambles on, the heroic contributions and monumental achievements of black Americans take center stage. We remember these champions and the bouts they fought, but they’re presented as extraordinary human beings—legends whose anomalous stories don’t neatly translate to everyday interracial encounters. As I move around the country, the behavior that greets me is usually more influenced by the black faces that fill crime-ridden local newscasts than the exceptionality of Charles Drew, James Baldwin, or Thurgood Marshall. The great black women and men who populate Black History Month celebrations feel like characters in a novel—a world away from the black guy a few steps behind you in a barren parking garage.

In short, exceptions tend to prove the rule. A detached appreciation of Harriet Tubman and her Underground Railroad does not change the way drivers react when they pull up alongside a car full of black teenagers at a stoplight—or the purse-clutching that occurs when I pass women at the train station.

What gets lost in the gleam of these once-in-a-generation personalities and tip-of-the-iceberg events is the dull ache in the glacier below. A closer examination of those hidden feelings always seems to elude the nation, even during this month of spotlight. It’s the genesis of the uncomfortable silence that hangs in the air whenever someone attempts to begin a conversation on race. The prerequisite for honest dialogue is an admission that blackness is uncomfortable to others, and that this fact influences the behavior of us all.

Combating this harmful notion is hard work. The threatening caricature of blackness spans hundreds of years. It dates back to the laws that prohibited large gatherings of slaves, out of an irrational fear that any such congregation would lead to a dastardly plot to kill white men and rape their women. It carries through the subtle implications in the “analysis” of a dreadlocked black football player’s post-game exuberance. The public face of black America is dominated by the tragedy porn of male criminality and recidivism, welfare mothers with babies by multiple men, and dilapidated neighborhoods with shiftless neighbors. All of this reinforces the notions that make blackness threatening to Americans of other cultures.

Establishing Black History month was a significant achievement, but the next step is to snatch history from the wind and plant it in the personal narratives of black Americans. The names subjected to rote February recitations intersect with personal, everyday stories. Black Americans should use the month as a time for deeper, and more public, exploration of their own journeys in an attempt to combat the lazy labels plastered on the black experience.
In my mind, America’s culinary scene was premature with the whole fusion jump-off. Most Americans don’t even understand the differences between Shanghainese, Hunanese, Sichuanese, or Cantonese food. Even in New York, where these cuisines are readily available, people are just now starting to understand and identify the nuances. A lot of chefs are in a hurry to profit off of appropriated versions of ethnic food without any respect, recognition, or understanding of where these flavors came from. There’s a double standard, too. When my dad had a steakhouse, everyone questioned whether a Chinese person was qualified to open a steakhouse. We had to have white people front like the chef and owners. It was not OK for my dad to sell steak, but white people cooking Asian get more attention than the people in Chinatown who actually know what the fuck they’re doing.
Eddie Huang, “Fresh Off The Boat” (via delask)

(via sociallyinadequate)

ruthhopkins:

Boarding schools used Native appropriation to embarrass, degrade & exercise control over Native children. Native appropriation is an extension of the federal government’s assimilation and termination policies to ‘kill the Indian and save the man.’

(via yrmomschesthair)

babytiga:

okay Im gonna need folks to understand

  1. AAVE stands for African American Vernacular English
  2. AAVE is a language with structures and rules just like any other language
  3. use of AAVE is not “ghetto” and does not make a person unintelligent for using it
  4. that mocking it because it neglects your idea of “civilized speech” is pretty much anti black and makes you an asshole
  5. and it can be appropriated

simple to understand yes?

(via sociallyinadequate)